Help with ribber

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Thank you.
Barbara

Hi Barbara
You don’t say the make of your machine. If you have a Toyota you push the ribber hard against the main bed before tightening the screws which hold it in place.

For a Brother machine there are adjusting nuts and levers at both ends of the ribber. You’ll be able to see them if you drop the ribber. Check the height of the ribber by pushing it up as far as it will go. Bring several needles at each end of the main bed to holding position. You should be able to slide two of the ribber weight hooks together (flat shiny things with a hole in one end and hooks at the other) between the main bed needles and ribber sinker posts. They should be a snug fit but should not move the needles as you slide them in. To adjust the height drop the ribber loosen the nuts and use the levers to move it up or down. Check the gap and once you have it right re-tighten the nuts but make sure that the levers don’t move. It’s fiddly but with a bit of practise you should be able to get it right.

For adjustments to Silver Reed and Knitmaster machines Mary Weaver has a comprehensive explanation in her book – The Ribbing Attachment Part 2. I hope this helps you sort out the problem.

Kind regards
Sue

Sue P
2011-02-07 16:37:42
Hi Barbara
You don’t say the make of your machine. If you have a Toyota you push the ribber hard against the main bed before tightening the screws which hold it in place.

For a Brother machine there are adjusting nuts and levers at both ends of the ribber. You’ll be able to see them if you drop the ribber. Check the height of the ribber by pushing it up as far as it will go. Bring several needles at each end of the main bed to holding position. You should be able to slide two of the ribber weight hooks together (flat shiny things with a hole in one end and hooks at the other) between the main bed needles and ribber sinker posts. They should be a snug fit but should not move the needles as you slide them in. To adjust the height drop the ribber loosen the nuts and use the levers to move it up or down. Check the gap and once you have it right re-tighten the nuts but make sure that the levers don’t move. It’s fiddly but with a bit of practise you should be able to get it right.

For adjustments to Silver Reed and Knitmaster machines Mary Weaver has a comprehensive explanation in her book – The Ribbing Attachment Part 2. I hope this helps you sort out the problem.

Kind regards
Sue

Sue P
2011-02-07 16:37:42

Fair Isle sweater

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Can you please advise me on this as I’m not following any pattern, I’m working from my tension swatch.

Thank you

Hello Barbara
If you want to avoid having the top thicker than the body you could knit the main part in a 1×1 or similar alternating Fair Isle using your main yarn in both feeders. If you decide to do this knit a new tension swatch as the stitches and rows will probably be different than stocking stitch.
Hope your sweater is a success.
Regards
Sue.
Sue P
2010-12-30 15:25:17
You could try knitting 2 tension squares using a full number difference between the two. ie say tension for fairisle is 7 try the stocking stitch at tension 6. Unless you the full jumper as described in the first comment it may be difficult to achieve the same feel to the garment but should be able to achieve a resonable tension comparison. hope it goes well
kind regards
Min
Min1
2011-01-03 12:54:01