Three colour cast on

Posted on

My carriage jams knitting the first row. I don’t know what I am doing wrong. Should I use three colours together or alternate them? I am using Tension 10.

Hi Tanna

I know it’s a while since you posted your query but I did have a go at a three colour cast on.

If you bring the needles out to Holding Position but have the carriage set to knit you can weave the yarns over and under the needles – over one under two so that the different colours form a repeating pattern across the needles. Hang the cast on comb push the comb back to the gate pegs thread the carriage with one of the yarns and knit carefully across.

I hope this answers your query
Sue.

Sue P
2014-06-04 12:18:40
Hi Tanna

I know it’s a while since you posted your query but I did have a go at a three colour cast on.

If you bring the needles out to Holding Position but have the carriage set to knit you can weave the yarns over and under the needles – over one under two so that the different colours form a repeating pattern across the needles. Hang the cast on comb push the comb back to the gate pegs thread the carriage with one of the yarns and knit carefully across.

I hope this answers your query
Sue.

Sue P
2014-06-04 12:18:40

Brother KH836 Carriage jamming

Posted on

I got my Brother KH 836 machine out to knit up some left over wool to make myself a jumper. After lots of attempts with the ribber (the rib carriage kept coming unhitched!) I made the back and was nearly at the front neck shaping when the carriage jammed. It would knit right to left okay, but moving left to right it jammed in the middle every time. After a lot of shoving and a LOT more swearing, I got it moving again to finish the row, but after about ten more rows of this I gave it up as a bad job. It moves freely in each direction without the sinker plate, but not with it on. I’ve prodded, poked, sworn a lot more, thought I’d sorted it, but after about 15 rows it happened again. Can anyone give me a clue as to what might be the problem? I feel like taking the whole lot to the tip!

Bring your needles out and with no yarn and sinker plate attached go slowly across the needles and when it starts to jam check whether the needles are going over the sinker plate or just touching it. Often the sinker plate becomes slightly bent out of shape and may need realigning and bent back into shape.

Re your ribber – sounds like the height may need adjusting if you have it in the highest position and the connecting pin is still slipping out.

jaysdowell
2013-08-09 15:14:16
Hi PollyDoodle

Sorry to hear of your problem. There are several things it might be an idea to check.

As the carriage moves freely without the sinker plate attached it suggests the problem is with the sinker plate. Is it seated properly on the carriage? Make sure the alignment holes in the sinker plate fit over the little lugs on the carriage before you tighten the thumb screws. Have the metal plates at the front gone out of alignment? When you attach it to the carriage check that these plates are parallel to the gate pegs and re-adjust if necessary by loosening the three screws underneath.

Does your sponge bar need replacing? If it’s worn it will cause all sorts of problems.

Regarding your problem with the ribber carriage did you have the ribber pushed up to its highest position and was the carriage seated properly on the needle bed? Once the ribber carriage has clipped into the connecting arm it should not move forward or unhitch itself!

I hope this helps you sort the problem.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-06-12 21:53:47
Bring your needles out and with no yarn and sinker plate attached go slowly across the needles and when it starts to jam check whether the needles are going over the sinker plate or just touching it. Often the sinker plate becomes slightly bent out of shape and may need realigning and bent back into shape.

Re your ribber – sounds like the height may need adjusting if you have it in the highest position and the connecting pin is still slipping out.

jaysdowell
2013-08-09 15:14:16
Hi PollyDoodle

Sorry to hear of your problem. There are several things it might be an idea to check.

As the carriage moves freely without the sinker plate attached it suggests the problem is with the sinker plate. Is it seated properly on the carriage? Make sure the alignment holes in the sinker plate fit over the little lugs on the carriage before you tighten the thumb screws. Have the metal plates at the front gone out of alignment? When you attach it to the carriage check that these plates are parallel to the gate pegs and re-adjust if necessary by loosening the three screws underneath.

Does your sponge bar need replacing? If it’s worn it will cause all sorts of problems.

Regarding your problem with the ribber carriage did you have the ribber pushed up to its highest position and was the carriage seated properly on the needle bed? Once the ribber carriage has clipped into the connecting arm it should not move forward or unhitch itself!

I hope this helps you sort the problem.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-06-12 21:53:47

Toyota KS 901 not stitching

Posted on

I have had this machine given to me and its in full working order complete with manuals and pattern books. I have briefly been on a machine knit course through university so I know all the basics, but I wanted to expand my knowledge and start making! I’ve followed the instructions to the dot in setting it up and at first it would do a quick cast on (right to left) and on the way back it would just miss the needles and not stitch. After searching the internet and asking friends they mentioned the sponge bar..It was completely flat! I got some draft excluder and changed it in hope it would work! Now its not picking up and stitches either way and its driving me insane! All the settings and dials are correct. I’ve checked the carriage brushes and wheels for wrapped thread and there isn’t any. I don’t know where to go next with it!? If anyone can help it would be amazing.
Thanks, Jade

Hi Jade

Sorry to hear you are having problems. When you put the draught excluder on the bar did you tape round the ends to keep it in place? This is very important to stop it peeling off inside the machine. Now that you have this new sponge in place are the needles held down at the front of the machine or are they raised slightly? They should be held down by the sponge. (I find the brown draught excluder works best as it has a smooth finish and the white stuff is too dense.)
Next make sure the carriage is seated properly on the machine. Take off the sinker plate and remove the carriage. Then slide it on from one end making sure that the back slides under the lip at the back of the machine and the front slides under the lip at the front. You should not be able to lift the carriage at all unless you use the orange lever. You can check by bringing out a few needles and running the carriage over them with no yarn. You will be able to see if they are moving properly. Then fit the sinker plate making sure it seats properly on the lugs on the carriage.
When you have re-threaded the carriage bring out alternate needles and using a low tension number knit across and you should have a loop on every needle. Hang the cast on comb. Change the tension to one suitable for the yarn you are using and knit back. You should have alternate loops and stitches. You should be able to continue knitting.
I do hope you get your machine to work properly.
Kind regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-05-01 11:28:38
Hi Jade

Sorry to hear you are having problems. When you put the draught excluder on the bar did you tape round the ends to keep it in place? This is very important to stop it peeling off inside the machine. Now that you have this new sponge in place are the needles held down at the front of the machine or are they raised slightly? They should be held down by the sponge. (I find the brown draught excluder works best as it has a smooth finish and the white stuff is too dense.)
Next make sure the carriage is seated properly on the machine. Take off the sinker plate and remove the carriage. Then slide it on from one end making sure that the back slides under the lip at the back of the machine and the front slides under the lip at the front. You should not be able to lift the carriage at all unless you use the orange lever. You can check by bringing out a few needles and running the carriage over them with no yarn. You will be able to see if they are moving properly. Then fit the sinker plate making sure it seats properly on the lugs on the carriage.
When you have re-threaded the carriage bring out alternate needles and using a low tension number knit across and you should have a loop on every needle. Hang the cast on comb. Change the tension to one suitable for the yarn you are using and knit back. You should have alternate loops and stitches. You should be able to continue knitting.
I do hope you get your machine to work properly.
Kind regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-05-01 11:28:38

Knitting pattern for garment with hood

Posted on

Does anyone have a machine knitting pattern for a garment with a hood please?

Hi
I have found the following patterns in back issues of Machine Knitting Monthly:
Woman’s Hooded tunic p.30 January 2010
Child’s Hooded Jacket p.24 November 2012
Young Child’s Hooded Jacket and Sweater p.30 March 2012
Baby’s Hooded Jacket p.18 February 2012
According to the latest issue of the magazine all the 2012 magazines are still available but the January 2010 issue is sold out. You might be able to find one on ebay.
There are also sites on the Internet that have free patterns; try a search on ‘Google’.
Hoping this is what you are looking for.
Regards
Sue.
Sue P
2013-05-06 20:46:27
Thank you very much Sue – I’ll get on ebay and start looking for the Jan 2010 issue.
Regards Magsie
magsieleaper
2013-05-08 12:40:52
Hi
I have found the following patterns in back issues of Machine Knitting Monthly:
Woman’s Hooded tunic p.30 January 2010
Child’s Hooded Jacket p.24 November 2012
Young Child’s Hooded Jacket and Sweater p.30 March 2012
Baby’s Hooded Jacket p.18 February 2012
According to the latest issue of the magazine all the 2012 magazines are still available but the January 2010 issue is sold out. You might be able to find one on ebay.
There are also sites on the Internet that have free patterns; try a search on ‘Google’.
Hoping this is what you are looking for.
Regards
Sue.
Sue P
2013-05-06 20:46:27
Thank you very much Sue – I’ll get on ebay and start looking for the Jan 2010 issue.
Regards Magsie
magsieleaper
2013-05-08 12:40:52

V’ neckbands

Posted on

I have had several unsuccessful attempts to machine knit a sweater with a ‘V’ neckband. Can anyone suggest an easy method please.

Hi Annie

When you get to the point where you need to divide the work for the ‘V’ neck it is probably easiest to remove the lefthand stitches on waste yarn and remove any weights that you have on that side of the knitting. You can then knit the first side of the ‘V’ without worrying about the other stitches. Then place the stitches back on to the needles and knit the second side.
An easy band for a ‘V’ neck is to knit straight pieces of ribbing one for one side of the ‘V’ and one to go across the back neck and along the other side of the ‘V’. If you knit the required depth of ribbing then transfer the stitches from the ribber to the main bed and knit one row at main tension it gives a neat edge against the garment. Then you can pick up the stitches from the garment with the wrong side facing you knit one row at main tension and one row at tension 10 and latch off the stitches. To finish just overlap the front ends of the rib and stitch down along the line of the ‘V’.
I have knitted this many times and it always gives a neat finish.
I hope this helps
regards Sue.

Sue P
2013-05-01 11:48:49
Hi Annie

When you get to the point where you need to divide the work for the ‘V’ neck it is probably easiest to remove the lefthand stitches on waste yarn and remove any weights that you have on that side of the knitting. You can then knit the first side of the ‘V’ without worrying about the other stitches. Then place the stitches back on to the needles and knit the second side.
An easy band for a ‘V’ neck is to knit straight pieces of ribbing one for one side of the ‘V’ and one to go across the back neck and along the other side of the ‘V’. If you knit the required depth of ribbing then transfer the stitches from the ribber to the main bed and knit one row at main tension it gives a neat edge against the garment. Then you can pick up the stitches from the garment with the wrong side facing you knit one row at main tension and one row at tension 10 and latch off the stitches. To finish just overlap the front ends of the rib and stitch down along the line of the ‘V’.
I have knitted this many times and it always gives a neat finish.
I hope this helps
regards Sue.

Sue P
2013-05-01 11:48:49

Brother 950i

Posted on

I was about to programme a pattern into my Brother 950i using a Mylar sheet when it suddenly stopped working. I can still use the built-in patterns but can’t input my own. Can anyone give me any advice please?

Circular Knitting

Posted on

Hi All
I have just done a sample piece of circular knitting for the first time on my Toyota KS901 and KR501 ribber. I used 3-ply and tension 4/4. The trouble is that both edge stitches for the full length of the tubular piece are very untidy and any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Very kind regards.

Hi Alan
Yes it is possible. ‘A Machine Knitter’s Guide’ by Lewis and Weissman explains how.
You need to punch a card with the colours separated one colour per row starting with the backing colour as for double jacquard.
The card feed has to be set to the back position so that the card will only rotate every other row.
Set the main carriage to slip in both directions and the ribber carriage to slip to the right and knit to the left.
RC1 the foundation row is knitted from right to left; the ribber needles will knit and the patterning needles on the main bed will be set.
RC2 knit from left to right; only background needles on main bed will knit.
Now push all needles on main bed back to ‘B’ so that they will not knit on the next row.
Change yarn.
RC3 knit design colour on ribber bed and select needles for design colour on main bed.
RC4 knit design stitches on main bed.
Push all needles on main bed to ‘B’ so they will not knit on the next row.
Change yarn.
These four rows form one complete row of pattern.
To compensate for there being more rows knitted on the ribber you need a smaller stitch size and extra weights.
This will produce a very firm fabric of one row stripes on the ribber suitable for soles of socks or palms of gloves and mittens.
There are other combination of stitches shown in the book but I will not give details here as it will confuse matters.
I have not tried this out myself yet but it has possibilities!
Hope you succed regards Sue.
Sue P
2013-05-03 16:49:59
Hi

There are several points you could check:

Is the tension on the yarn mast correct? If it is too loose you will get loops at the edges which make the stitches larger.

Don’t take the carriages too far past the knitting as that can also cause loops.

Whilst knitting circular have the beds set at P so that the needles are opposite each other; this closes the gap between the end stitches on each bed.
However if you change to ribbing make sure you set the beds on H again so that the needles do not hit into each other.

One other thing you might find that you need the tension on the ribber dial set to 4.2 as ribbers usually knit a bit tighter than the main bed.

Hope this helps
Sue.

Sue P
2013-03-07 10:30:56
Hi
Thanks for the advice I hadn’t put the needles directly opposite each other the tubular knitting is working perfectly now. Is it possible to include punchcard patterns on these machines with tubular? I understand that the ribber has no pattern facility but thought maybe it is possible to do patterning on the main bed so that I get a tube with patterning on one side. Trouble is I seem to have tried every combination of the cam set levers on the main bed but always the knitting reverts to a single knitted piece. Am I missing something or is it not possible? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Very kind regards Alan
Stivi
2013-05-03 11:09:43
Hi Alan
Yes it is possible. ‘A Machine Knitter’s Guide’ by Lewis and Weissman explains how.
You need to punch a card with the colours separated one colour per row starting with the backing colour as for double jacquard.
The card feed has to be set to the back position so that the card will only rotate every other row.
Set the main carriage to slip in both directions and the ribber carriage to slip to the right and knit to the left.
RC1 the foundation row is knitted from right to left; the ribber needles will knit and the patterning needles on the main bed will be set.
RC2 knit from left to right; only background needles on main bed will knit.
Now push all needles on main bed back to ‘B’ so that they will not knit on the next row.
Change yarn.
RC3 knit design colour on ribber bed and select needles for design colour on main bed.
RC4 knit design stitches on main bed.
Push all needles on main bed to ‘B’ so they will not knit on the next row.
Change yarn.
These four rows form one complete row of pattern.
To compensate for there being more rows knitted on the ribber you need a smaller stitch size and extra weights.
This will produce a very firm fabric of one row stripes on the ribber suitable for soles of socks or palms of gloves and mittens.
There are other combination of stitches shown in the book but I will not give details here as it will confuse matters.
I have not tried this out myself yet but it has possibilities!
Hope you succed regards Sue.
Sue P
2013-05-03 16:49:59
Hi

There are several points you could check:

Is the tension on the yarn mast correct? If it is too loose you will get loops at the edges which make the stitches larger.

Don’t take the carriages too far past the knitting as that can also cause loops.

Whilst knitting circular have the beds set at P so that the needles are opposite each other; this closes the gap between the end stitches on each bed.
However if you change to ribbing make sure you set the beds on H again so that the needles do not hit into each other.

One other thing you might find that you need the tension on the ribber dial set to 4.2 as ribbers usually knit a bit tighter than the main bed.

Hope this helps
Sue.

Sue P
2013-03-07 10:30:56
Hi
Thanks for the advice I hadn’t put the needles directly opposite each other the tubular knitting is working perfectly now. Is it possible to include punchcard patterns on these machines with tubular? I understand that the ribber has no pattern facility but thought maybe it is possible to do patterning on the main bed so that I get a tube with patterning on one side. Trouble is I seem to have tried every combination of the cam set levers on the main bed but always the knitting reverts to a single knitted piece. Am I missing something or is it not possible? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Very kind regards Alan
Stivi
2013-05-03 11:09:43

Knitmaster PE1 problems

Posted on

Can anyone help with advice on this? I don’t know if I’m doing something wrong, or if the PE1 is faulty. I’ve followed the instructions in the manual and everything seems to be okay, but when I click the inspection button light off and press = on the controller it doesn’t feed the card through the reader to read it into the controller. The display says okay but there’s nothing read into the controller because the card doesn’t move.
Thanks for any help.

I have had a problem with my PE1 for some time but it turned out to be a problem with my computer.
As the PE 1 is simply a memory you do not need it to knit a pattern from a card. However if you are saving the pattern onto the PE1 for future use then I think you follow the instructions and then remove card so you can knit from PE1. PLease let me know if I am barking up the wrong tree as there sre very few of us Knitmaster/SR knitters left I use the SR 840
ozmartian
2013-01-27 18:30:35
My first reaction was: Change the cell batterie in the PE-1 Memory card.

Reading further down in your question I assume that something is wrong with the EC-1 pattern reader – or maybe not. Have you tried to set up the EC-1 without the PE-1? Is there still a problem? Or does the card feed through the reader? If no: Clean the reader with the blue cleaning sheet. And take a soft dry cottoncloth rinse the magnet on the pointcams and the magnet on the back of the carriage. Hope that can get you further on. By the way what kind of machine do you use?

strikkan
2013-01-10 18:17:34
I have had a problem with my PE1 for some time but it turned out to be a problem with my computer.
As the PE 1 is simply a memory you do not need it to knit a pattern from a card. However if you are saving the pattern onto the PE1 for future use then I think you follow the instructions and then remove card so you can knit from PE1. PLease let me know if I am barking up the wrong tree as there sre very few of us Knitmaster/SR knitters left I use the SR 840
ozmartian
2013-01-27 18:30:35
My first reaction was: Change the cell batterie in the PE-1 Memory card.

Reading further down in your question I assume that something is wrong with the EC-1 pattern reader – or maybe not. Have you tried to set up the EC-1 without the PE-1? Is there still a problem? Or does the card feed through the reader? If no: Clean the reader with the blue cleaning sheet. And take a soft dry cottoncloth rinse the magnet on the pointcams and the magnet on the back of the carriage. Hope that can get you further on. By the way what kind of machine do you use?

strikkan
2013-01-10 18:17:34

Bill King – All in one top – December 2011

Posted on
Dear Sue

Thankyou very much for the explanation on ‘TURN’ in Bill Kings pattern all in one ‘Gold Star’.

I must have had a senior moment. When I read your reply everything was crystal clear. I am going to start on it right now.

Thankyou again.

Janice Hill (Maud)

maud
2013-01-27 18:30:35
Hi

At the bottom of page 54 where it says TO KNIT it explains what a ‘turn’ is. For this pattern after you cast on you knit 70 rows straight for the sleeve. Then comes the turn.

You need to set your carriage to HOLD. Then you bring a group of three needles to Holding Position at the opposite end to the carriage and knit four rows.

When you have the last group of three still in Working Position knit four rows. Then return the group of needles nearest the carriage from Holding Position to Upper Working Position and knit four rows until all needles are back in Working Position. Knit four rows across all needles.

This constitutes one turn and the picture in the middle at the bottom of page 55 shows what it looks like. The diagonal row of holes runs up the middle of the of the turn and you knit four more complete turns.

To finish the piece you knit 70 rows straight for the other half of the sleeve.

You will be knitting one complete sleeve and side of the garment. If you fold this piece in half along the third row of holes you will need to join the two long edges at the top and the two shorter edges for the underarm seam.

When you have knitted two of these shapes they are sewn together at the back seam to make the completed garment.

I hope this has removed some of the mystery and you are successful with your garment.

Kind regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-01-11 12:06:57
Dear Sue

Thankyou very much for the explanation on ‘TURN’ in Bill Kings pattern all in one ‘Gold Star’.

I must have had a senior moment. When I read your reply everything was crystal clear. I am going to start on it right now.

Thankyou again.

Janice Hill (Maud)

maud
2013-01-27 18:30:35
Hi

At the bottom of page 54 where it says TO KNIT it explains what a ‘turn’ is. For this pattern after you cast on you knit 70 rows straight for the sleeve. Then comes the turn.

You need to set your carriage to HOLD. Then you bring a group of three needles to Holding Position at the opposite end to the carriage and knit four rows.

When you have the last group of three still in Working Position knit four rows. Then return the group of needles nearest the carriage from Holding Position to Upper Working Position and knit four rows until all needles are back in Working Position. Knit four rows across all needles.

This constitutes one turn and the picture in the middle at the bottom of page 55 shows what it looks like. The diagonal row of holes runs up the middle of the of the turn and you knit four more complete turns.

To finish the piece you knit 70 rows straight for the other half of the sleeve.

You will be knitting one complete sleeve and side of the garment. If you fold this piece in half along the third row of holes you will need to join the two long edges at the top and the two shorter edges for the underarm seam.

When you have knitted two of these shapes they are sewn together at the back seam to make the completed garment.

I hope this has removed some of the mystery and you are successful with your garment.

Kind regards
Sue.

Sue P
2013-01-11 12:06:57