Punchcard graph

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Hi
I’m looking for a punchcard design (24 stitches wide by about 30 to 40 rows high) of a slanted guitar, suitable for a toddler’s jumper. Can anybody help please? I’ve looked through all my patterns to no avail.
Thank you in advance.
Janet

Hi Janet
Can I suggest you draw out a graph to suit your tension 24 stitches wide by however many rows you want. For example if your tension was 4 stitches and 6 rows to the inch your graph would measure 6 inches wide by 5 inches deep from top to bottom. (24 sts divided by 4 sts = 6 inches; 30 rows divided by 6 rows = 5 inches).
Draw the lines across and down to represent stitches and rows making individual squares – but use your own tension figures. This will give you an area true to the size of your knitting. Find an image of a guitar to trace or copy onto the graph then blank out all the squares that are at least three quarters covered by the outline. Each square represents a full stitch so don’t use squares where only a tiny corner is covered.
Punch out line by line onto a punchcard. This should give you a good outline of any subject just fill it in knitting with the colours of your choice. The pattern may look elongated when you punch it out on the punchcard but will knit up exactly as it appears on the graph.
It’s a bit complicated I know but worth a try if nothing else turns up.
Hope that helps
Wren
wren
2012-03-28 17:46:18
Hi Janet
Can I suggest you draw out a graph to suit your tension 24 stitches wide by however many rows you want. For example if your tension was 4 stitches and 6 rows to the inch your graph would measure 6 inches wide by 5 inches deep from top to bottom. (24 sts divided by 4 sts = 6 inches; 30 rows divided by 6 rows = 5 inches).
Draw the lines across and down to represent stitches and rows making individual squares – but use your own tension figures. This will give you an area true to the size of your knitting. Find an image of a guitar to trace or copy onto the graph then blank out all the squares that are at least three quarters covered by the outline. Each square represents a full stitch so don’t use squares where only a tiny corner is covered.
Punch out line by line onto a punchcard. This should give you a good outline of any subject just fill it in knitting with the colours of your choice. The pattern may look elongated when you punch it out on the punchcard but will knit up exactly as it appears on the graph.
It’s a bit complicated I know but worth a try if nothing else turns up.
Hope that helps
Wren
wren
2012-03-28 17:46:18