Toyota machine and ribber

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Hi
I have been given a very dirty, old and unloved Toyota KS901 complete with a Toyota KS501 ribber but there are no manuals to go with them. I have no idea how to get this machine back into a decent and running condition. Can anyone help me please?

Hi Glenys

Your machine sounds like mine was when I received it. Giving it a really good clean will stand you in good stead for the future.

If you go to http://www.tphuktrading.com/toyota-knitting-machine-e-manuals-20-c.asp you will be able to buy the manuals for these machines. They are £3.50 each and are sent out by email.

To make a start on cleaning the machine you will need a bottle of Surgical Spirit (not Methylated Spirit) and some sewing/knitting machine oil. Add about a teaspoon of oil to the Surgical Spirit. You will also need a couple of jam jars and some cotton cloth – old t-shirt fabric is good – a 1/2″ paint brush cotton buds and plenty of newspaper!.

First brush all the fluff out from under the carriage then using the paint brush dipped in some of the Surgical Spirit give it a really good clean to remove every last trace of old oil. Wipe dry and apply a thin coating of oil with a cotton bud along all the channels. You can use the Surgical Spirit on the plastic too.

Working on one bed at a time: remove the sponge bar (inside the front of the needle bed) close all the latches on the needles and take out all of the needles by pushing forward lifting the butt and sliding backwards. Closing the latches makes sure you don’t damage the needles. Once they are removed you can take off the numbered strip and wipe it clean.

As you remove them put the needles into a jam jar. Pour in some of the Surgical Spirit and leave to soak whilst you clean the machine. Vacuum out as much fluff as you can. A long stem cleaning brush is very useful for removing gunk from inside the needle bed. You might need to use a needle to hook out any stubborn bits. Then wipe over with some of the Surgical Spirit to remove all the old oil.

You will need to clean the rolling mechanism at the back of the needle bed – I expect it will be very stiff – and oil the ends of each section.

Once the main body of the machine is clean you can return to the needles. Give the jar a good shake to loosen the dirt and take the needles out one at a time. Wipe dry then wipe with a lightly oiled cloth. Open the latch and replace into the needle bed: through the front slot drop into place and slide back.

Check each needle as you go and discard any that are bent and have stiff latches.

Before you replace the sponge bar check the foam on it. I expect it will be very flat if so it will need replacing. Some people recommend replacing the bar with a Silver Reed one as Toyota’s are no longer available but you can replace the foam with draught excluder. You will need the brown foam draught excluder as the white one is too dense. If you decide to replace the foam this way make sure you tape round the ends well so it doesn’t come off.

I hope this does not sound too daunting. If you take it one step at a time you should be O.K. Let me know if you need anything clarified.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-03-22 13:19:00
Hi Glenys

Your machine sounds like mine was when I received it. Giving it a really good clean will stand you in good stead for the future.

If you go to http://www.tphuktrading.com/toyota-knitting-machine-e-manuals-20-c.asp you will be able to buy the manuals for these machines. They are £3.50 each and are sent out by email.

To make a start on cleaning the machine you will need a bottle of Surgical Spirit (not Methylated Spirit) and some sewing/knitting machine oil. Add about a teaspoon of oil to the Surgical Spirit. You will also need a couple of jam jars and some cotton cloth – old t-shirt fabric is good – a 1/2″ paint brush cotton buds and plenty of newspaper!.

First brush all the fluff out from under the carriage then using the paint brush dipped in some of the Surgical Spirit give it a really good clean to remove every last trace of old oil. Wipe dry and apply a thin coating of oil with a cotton bud along all the channels. You can use the Surgical Spirit on the plastic too.

Working on one bed at a time: remove the sponge bar (inside the front of the needle bed) close all the latches on the needles and take out all of the needles by pushing forward lifting the butt and sliding backwards. Closing the latches makes sure you don’t damage the needles. Once they are removed you can take off the numbered strip and wipe it clean.

As you remove them put the needles into a jam jar. Pour in some of the Surgical Spirit and leave to soak whilst you clean the machine. Vacuum out as much fluff as you can. A long stem cleaning brush is very useful for removing gunk from inside the needle bed. You might need to use a needle to hook out any stubborn bits. Then wipe over with some of the Surgical Spirit to remove all the old oil.

You will need to clean the rolling mechanism at the back of the needle bed – I expect it will be very stiff – and oil the ends of each section.

Once the main body of the machine is clean you can return to the needles. Give the jar a good shake to loosen the dirt and take the needles out one at a time. Wipe dry then wipe with a lightly oiled cloth. Open the latch and replace into the needle bed: through the front slot drop into place and slide back.

Check each needle as you go and discard any that are bent and have stiff latches.

Before you replace the sponge bar check the foam on it. I expect it will be very flat if so it will need replacing. Some people recommend replacing the bar with a Silver Reed one as Toyota’s are no longer available but you can replace the foam with draught excluder. You will need the brown foam draught excluder as the white one is too dense. If you decide to replace the foam this way make sure you tape round the ends well so it doesn’t come off.

I hope this does not sound too daunting. If you take it one step at a time you should be O.K. Let me know if you need anything clarified.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-03-22 13:19:00
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