Spring knitting

Posted on

It’s been a strange month in the South East and we’ve seen temperatures plummeting to minus eleven one morning and soaring to twelve degrees by lunchtime the next day. I’ve never been more thankful for all the knitted clothes in my wardrobe, because I’ve certainly needed to add an extra layer to keep warm. My first choice is always a warm gilet Jane Woodward designed for us in Cashmere for the August 2009 issue. It always reminds me that yarns such as Lamb’s Wool, Cashmere, Alpaca and Mohair keep animals warm and they do the same for us, too. They may be more expensive than man-made fibres, but usually only small quantities are needed and it can be well worth some occasional self-indulgence.

If you live within travelling distance of Nottingham then please turn to Page 6, where we’ve 20 free tickets to give away for the show on 15th April. We’ll have the usual Lucky Dip, so please send in a self-addressed and stamped envelope as soon as you can. Don’t forget to mark the top left hand corner of both envelopes with ‘Nottingham’ and I hope you’re one of our winners. Guest speakers this year are Sue Booth 11.00 am, Iris Bishop at 1.30 pm and Erica Thomson at 2.30 pm. The lectures cost an extra £1 each and numbers are limited, so book in advance. There’s more information about the show and contact details on Page 33.

Carol Hocknell tells me that a few places still remain for this year’s Dream Week from 3rd to 7th September. It’s probably the annual highlight event in the machine knitting calendar and visitors flock to Cheshire from all over the world. There are some wonderful tutors this year including Iris Bishop and Bill King and I’m always very pleased to be asked to join in the fun. If you’d like more information about Dream Week then give Carol a call now on 01270-628414.

Finally, let me remind you that March has five Thursdays so you’ll have to wait just a bit longer for your May magazine. It will be mailed out to subscribers on Thursday 5th April and it’s officially on sale on Thursday 12th April. By then Easter will have come and gone, I’ll be heading for the Nottingham Show and I hope to see as many of you who can join us. Until then happy knitting.

CURRENT ISSUE
April 2012
Subscription copies sent out
Thursday 1st March
On sale Thursday 8th March
Ask your newsagent to
Reserve a copy : see page 61

Dear Anne
Thank you for a really good magazine. I have knitted the baby cardigan from Carole Nixon on my Pfaff Duo 80 using 2/30s yarn. Setting the front bed pushers 2 up 2 down front lock BX< and back bed N and using the tensions as pattern. It knitted up beautifully. The pattern for the boy's slipover in 4 ply is also on my agenda. I haven't done much knitting lately and feel I'm getting rusty. Having accumulated so much yarn I thought I really must get cracking and explore the potential of my machine!
I’m also going to knit up some of the patterns from the copies of PKMJ that Alice Wilmshurst published. Thank you both for the inspiration to get knitting again.
Kind regards to all at MKM.
Sue.
Sue P
2011-12-01 20:25:40
It’s a great post I love to read and I agree with your thinking. Please share more information such as this. Thanks.
yerixgob
2011-12-01 20:25:40
Dear Anne
Thank you for a really good magazine. I’ve knitted the baby cardigan from Carole Nixon on my Pfaff Duo 80 using 2/30s yarn. Setting the front bed pushers 2 up 2 down front lock BX< and back bed N and using the tensions as pattern. It knitted up beautifully. The pattern for the boy's slipover in 4-ply is also on my agenda. I haven't done much knitting lately and feel I'm getting rusty. Having accumulated so much yarn I thought I really must get cracking and explore the potential of my machine! I'm also going to knit up some of the patterns from the copies of PKMJ that Alice Wilmshurst published. Thank you both for the inspiration to get knitting again. Kind regards to all at MKM.
Sue.
yerixgob
2011-12-01 20:25:40
Hi
On re-reading my comment I have realized that the front lock setting should be AX for tuck stitch; BX is for slip stitch!
I knitted a slipover and swiss darned a car from one of the Harmony books across the front. It looked really good.
At the moment I am knitting the Maggie Andrews cardigan from the December 2008 issue of the magazine on my Toyota 901 using Amber 4 ply at T 6.1. My tension is slightly different than that in the magazine so I am knitting a smaller size.
I found that reducing the tension for the weaving made the knitting stretch into a point each end so I left the setting on MT and it looks a lot neater. So far I have knitted the back starting with an e-wrap cast on and picking up the loops for the second side. I cast off the stitches for the armhole but removed the side seam stitches on WY ready to join the back and front on the machine. I’m hoping to finish the knitting next week.
Regards Sue.
Sue P
2011-12-02 18:25:57
Hello there

I would just like to make a comment on the January 2012 magazine. If this is what we have to look forward to in the New Year – then bring it on is what I say!

This is the first time that I have actually sat for a good hour or more reading MKM. I don’t mean to be critical but some of the patterns in the past leave a lot to be desired. I know the aim is to attract young knitters – but baggy drop-shouldered jumpers with holes in here and there and no real neckline (just a curled edge) are really not the way to go in my opinion.

I know that as an Editor it must be extremely hard to constantly find good patterns for the magazine but I would rather see one really good design than three bad ones.

I am so happy to see that patterns are starting to creep back into the magazine that have fitted sleeve heads and good patterning on them. Long may it last is what I say. For me to sit and read the magazine for over an hour shows just how good it was this month. Normally I look through it sigh and put it with the other mags from previous months. This month you really did capture my imagination and I feel that I really do have to hold up my hands and say a big thank you.

I have had a your magazine for so many years that I can’t remember when I first took out the subscription and there is no way that I would stop. It takes a lot to make me sit and write but I just felt that this month I really had to.

One final thought; with the cold weather nearly upon us and fuel bills rising is there any chance of one month there being patterns for heavy curtains door stops long skirts bed spreads rugs bottle covers blankets – anything that will keep the home warm and snug and help fight the fuel bills. I know you have to plan in advance but thought maybe it might be possible.

Kind regards Hilary

silverleat
2011-12-07 21:11:49
Hi
I moved house eight years ago and I’ve just started to machine knit again. I don’t know of any other machine knitters in my area and would love to discuss topics with like-minded people. It would be lovely to share knitting experiences with someone else and I wonder if there’s anyone out there or does anyone know of any clubs?
Ever hopeful Sheila
Sheila C
2012-01-20 17:47:44
Thank you for a really good magazine.
dannyclarke
2012-03-05 15:51:24

Spring knitting

Posted on

It’s been a strange month in the South East and we’ve seen temperatures plummeting to minus eleven one morning and soaring to twelve degrees by lunchtime the next day. I’ve never been more thankful for all the knitted clothes in my wardrobe, because I’ve certainly needed to add an extra layer to keep warm. My first choice is always a warm gilet Jane Woodward designed for us in Cashmere for the August 2009 issue. It always reminds me that yarns such as Lamb’s Wool, Cashmere, Alpaca and Mohair keep animals warm and they do the same for us, too. They may be more expensive than man-made fibres, but usually only small quantities are needed and it can be well worth some occasional self-indulgence.

If you live within travelling distance of Nottingham then please turn to Page 6, where we’ve 20 free tickets to give away for the show on 15th April. We’ll have the usual Lucky Dip, so please send in a self-addressed and stamped envelope as soon as you can. Don’t forget to mark the top left hand corner of both envelopes with ‘Nottingham’ and I hope you’re one of our winners. Guest speakers this year are Sue Booth 11.00 am, Iris Bishop at 1.30 pm and Erica Thomson at 2.30 pm. The lectures cost an extra £1 each and numbers are limited, so book in advance. There’s more information about the show and contact details on Page 33.

Carol Hocknell tells me that a few places still remain for this year’s Dream Week from 3rd to 7th September. It’s probably the annual highlight event in the machine knitting calendar and visitors flock to Cheshire from all over the world. There are some wonderful tutors this year including Iris Bishop and Bill King and I’m always very pleased to be asked to join in the fun. If you’d like more information about Dream Week then give Carol a call now on 01270-628414.

Finally, let me remind you that March has five Thursdays so you’ll have to wait just a bit longer for your May magazine. It will be mailed out to subscribers on Thursday 5th April and it’s officially on sale on Thursday 12th April. By then Easter will have come and gone, I’ll be heading for the Nottingham Show and I hope to see as many of you who can join us. Until then happy knitting.

CURRENT ISSUE
April 2012
Subscription copies sent out
Thursday 1st March
On sale Thursday 8th March
Ask your newsagent to
Reserve a copy : see page 61

Dear Anne
Thank you for a really good magazine. I have knitted the baby cardigan from Carole Nixon on my Pfaff Duo 80 using 2/30s yarn. Setting the front bed pushers 2 up 2 down front lock BX< and back bed N and using the tensions as pattern. It knitted up beautifully. The pattern for the boy's slipover in 4 ply is also on my agenda. I haven't done much knitting lately and feel I'm getting rusty. Having accumulated so much yarn I thought I really must get cracking and explore the potential of my machine!
I’m also going to knit up some of the patterns from the copies of PKMJ that Alice Wilmshurst published. Thank you both for the inspiration to get knitting again.
Kind regards to all at MKM.
Sue.
Sue P
2011-12-01 20:25:40
It’s a great post I love to read and I agree with your thinking. Please share more information such as this. Thanks.
yerixgob
2011-12-01 20:25:40
Dear Anne
Thank you for a really good magazine. I’ve knitted the baby cardigan from Carole Nixon on my Pfaff Duo 80 using 2/30s yarn. Setting the front bed pushers 2 up 2 down front lock BX< and back bed N and using the tensions as pattern. It knitted up beautifully. The pattern for the boy's slipover in 4-ply is also on my agenda. I haven't done much knitting lately and feel I'm getting rusty. Having accumulated so much yarn I thought I really must get cracking and explore the potential of my machine! I'm also going to knit up some of the patterns from the copies of PKMJ that Alice Wilmshurst published. Thank you both for the inspiration to get knitting again. Kind regards to all at MKM.
Sue.
yerixgob
2011-12-01 20:25:40
Hi
On re-reading my comment I have realized that the front lock setting should be AX for tuck stitch; BX is for slip stitch!
I knitted a slipover and swiss darned a car from one of the Harmony books across the front. It looked really good.
At the moment I am knitting the Maggie Andrews cardigan from the December 2008 issue of the magazine on my Toyota 901 using Amber 4 ply at T 6.1. My tension is slightly different than that in the magazine so I am knitting a smaller size.
I found that reducing the tension for the weaving made the knitting stretch into a point each end so I left the setting on MT and it looks a lot neater. So far I have knitted the back starting with an e-wrap cast on and picking up the loops for the second side. I cast off the stitches for the armhole but removed the side seam stitches on WY ready to join the back and front on the machine. I’m hoping to finish the knitting next week.
Regards Sue.
Sue P
2011-12-02 18:25:57
Hello there

I would just like to make a comment on the January 2012 magazine. If this is what we have to look forward to in the New Year – then bring it on is what I say!

This is the first time that I have actually sat for a good hour or more reading MKM. I don’t mean to be critical but some of the patterns in the past leave a lot to be desired. I know the aim is to attract young knitters – but baggy drop-shouldered jumpers with holes in here and there and no real neckline (just a curled edge) are really not the way to go in my opinion.

I know that as an Editor it must be extremely hard to constantly find good patterns for the magazine but I would rather see one really good design than three bad ones.

I am so happy to see that patterns are starting to creep back into the magazine that have fitted sleeve heads and good patterning on them. Long may it last is what I say. For me to sit and read the magazine for over an hour shows just how good it was this month. Normally I look through it sigh and put it with the other mags from previous months. This month you really did capture my imagination and I feel that I really do have to hold up my hands and say a big thank you.

I have had a your magazine for so many years that I can’t remember when I first took out the subscription and there is no way that I would stop. It takes a lot to make me sit and write but I just felt that this month I really had to.

One final thought; with the cold weather nearly upon us and fuel bills rising is there any chance of one month there being patterns for heavy curtains door stops long skirts bed spreads rugs bottle covers blankets – anything that will keep the home warm and snug and help fight the fuel bills. I know you have to plan in advance but thought maybe it might be possible.

Kind regards Hilary

silverleat
2011-12-07 21:11:49
Hi
I moved house eight years ago and I’ve just started to machine knit again. I don’t know of any other machine knitters in my area and would love to discuss topics with like-minded people. It would be lovely to share knitting experiences with someone else and I wonder if there’s anyone out there or does anyone know of any clubs?
Ever hopeful Sheila
Sheila C
2012-01-20 17:47:44
Thank you for a really good magazine.
dannyclarke
2012-03-05 15:51:24

Tension Rod

Posted on

Hi
I have to pull the yarn tight at the back of the tension rod every time I knit a row otherwise I end up with the yarn looping at the edges. I have checked the guide pin and plates and cannot see anything wrong with them. I have checked and double checked that the yarn is threaded correctly. Does anyone have any ideas?
Many thanks

Hi Fran

Sorry to hear you are having problems it’s frustrating to have to keep pulling down on the yarn but sometimes it is the only solution.

Is your tension suitable for the yarn you are using? I take it that you have tried tightening the disc tension. Make sure the yarn is on the inside of the pin between the discs.

Have you checked behind the plates in the tension discs? Fibres can build up behind them and cause problems.

Are you using a very fine yarn? Sometimes it helps to loop it right round the tension disc instead of just between the discs.

Hope this helps.
Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-03-09 17:24:34
Hi
I used to teach machine knitting at college. One of the ways of getting rid of looped yarn was to tape a plastic piece of tubing to the table under the yarn tension unit. Thread the yarn through the plastic piping and then through the yarn tension unit – and voila!

Another golden oldie was to use a tiered vegetable rack. Place the first cone on the bottom rack the second cone on the next rack up and so on. Thread the yarn through the centre of the cone above before threading through the yarn tension unit. This is great for multi-coloured cones and gives a better random appearance as it ‘twists’ the yarn as it feeds through the unit. I know that you’ve sorted your problem but it might be of some use to other members.

Vincentwood
2012-03-28 17:47:23
Hi Sue – thank you for your comments. Hubby got his screwdriver out and cleared out all the fluff that had gathered behind the spring – I was rather surprised how much there was as I have barely used the machine. Anyhow after trying again I noticed that it was not the tension rod but the ribber arm which ‘looped’ the yarn just before taking the carriage across. Fortunately I have two standard gauge ribbers and swapped the ribber arm – perfect! I think the other ribber arm may need some new brushes!!!Thank you for your comments though because I will make sure the tension spring is cleaned on a regular basis now. Best wishes – Fran
Fran
2012-03-16 16:23:33

Toyota machine and ribber

Posted on

Hi
I have been given a very dirty, old and unloved Toyota KS901 complete with a Toyota KS501 ribber but there are no manuals to go with them. I have no idea how to get this machine back into a decent and running condition. Can anyone help me please?

Hi Glenys

Your machine sounds like mine was when I received it. Giving it a really good clean will stand you in good stead for the future.

If you go to http://www.tphuktrading.com/toyota-knitting-machine-e-manuals-20-c.asp you will be able to buy the manuals for these machines. They are £3.50 each and are sent out by email.

To make a start on cleaning the machine you will need a bottle of Surgical Spirit (not Methylated Spirit) and some sewing/knitting machine oil. Add about a teaspoon of oil to the Surgical Spirit. You will also need a couple of jam jars and some cotton cloth – old t-shirt fabric is good – a 1/2″ paint brush cotton buds and plenty of newspaper!.

First brush all the fluff out from under the carriage then using the paint brush dipped in some of the Surgical Spirit give it a really good clean to remove every last trace of old oil. Wipe dry and apply a thin coating of oil with a cotton bud along all the channels. You can use the Surgical Spirit on the plastic too.

Working on one bed at a time: remove the sponge bar (inside the front of the needle bed) close all the latches on the needles and take out all of the needles by pushing forward lifting the butt and sliding backwards. Closing the latches makes sure you don’t damage the needles. Once they are removed you can take off the numbered strip and wipe it clean.

As you remove them put the needles into a jam jar. Pour in some of the Surgical Spirit and leave to soak whilst you clean the machine. Vacuum out as much fluff as you can. A long stem cleaning brush is very useful for removing gunk from inside the needle bed. You might need to use a needle to hook out any stubborn bits. Then wipe over with some of the Surgical Spirit to remove all the old oil.

You will need to clean the rolling mechanism at the back of the needle bed – I expect it will be very stiff – and oil the ends of each section.

Once the main body of the machine is clean you can return to the needles. Give the jar a good shake to loosen the dirt and take the needles out one at a time. Wipe dry then wipe with a lightly oiled cloth. Open the latch and replace into the needle bed: through the front slot drop into place and slide back.

Check each needle as you go and discard any that are bent and have stiff latches.

Before you replace the sponge bar check the foam on it. I expect it will be very flat if so it will need replacing. Some people recommend replacing the bar with a Silver Reed one as Toyota’s are no longer available but you can replace the foam with draught excluder. You will need the brown foam draught excluder as the white one is too dense. If you decide to replace the foam this way make sure you tape round the ends well so it doesn’t come off.

I hope this does not sound too daunting. If you take it one step at a time you should be O.K. Let me know if you need anything clarified.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-03-22 13:19:00
Hi Glenys

Your machine sounds like mine was when I received it. Giving it a really good clean will stand you in good stead for the future.

If you go to http://www.tphuktrading.com/toyota-knitting-machine-e-manuals-20-c.asp you will be able to buy the manuals for these machines. They are £3.50 each and are sent out by email.

To make a start on cleaning the machine you will need a bottle of Surgical Spirit (not Methylated Spirit) and some sewing/knitting machine oil. Add about a teaspoon of oil to the Surgical Spirit. You will also need a couple of jam jars and some cotton cloth – old t-shirt fabric is good – a 1/2″ paint brush cotton buds and plenty of newspaper!.

First brush all the fluff out from under the carriage then using the paint brush dipped in some of the Surgical Spirit give it a really good clean to remove every last trace of old oil. Wipe dry and apply a thin coating of oil with a cotton bud along all the channels. You can use the Surgical Spirit on the plastic too.

Working on one bed at a time: remove the sponge bar (inside the front of the needle bed) close all the latches on the needles and take out all of the needles by pushing forward lifting the butt and sliding backwards. Closing the latches makes sure you don’t damage the needles. Once they are removed you can take off the numbered strip and wipe it clean.

As you remove them put the needles into a jam jar. Pour in some of the Surgical Spirit and leave to soak whilst you clean the machine. Vacuum out as much fluff as you can. A long stem cleaning brush is very useful for removing gunk from inside the needle bed. You might need to use a needle to hook out any stubborn bits. Then wipe over with some of the Surgical Spirit to remove all the old oil.

You will need to clean the rolling mechanism at the back of the needle bed – I expect it will be very stiff – and oil the ends of each section.

Once the main body of the machine is clean you can return to the needles. Give the jar a good shake to loosen the dirt and take the needles out one at a time. Wipe dry then wipe with a lightly oiled cloth. Open the latch and replace into the needle bed: through the front slot drop into place and slide back.

Check each needle as you go and discard any that are bent and have stiff latches.

Before you replace the sponge bar check the foam on it. I expect it will be very flat if so it will need replacing. Some people recommend replacing the bar with a Silver Reed one as Toyota’s are no longer available but you can replace the foam with draught excluder. You will need the brown foam draught excluder as the white one is too dense. If you decide to replace the foam this way make sure you tape round the ends well so it doesn’t come off.

I hope this does not sound too daunting. If you take it one step at a time you should be O.K. Let me know if you need anything clarified.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-03-22 13:19:00

Punchcard graph

Posted on

Hi
I’m looking for a punchcard design (24 stitches wide by about 30 to 40 rows high) of a slanted guitar, suitable for a toddler’s jumper. Can anybody help please? I’ve looked through all my patterns to no avail.
Thank you in advance.
Janet

Hi Janet
Can I suggest you draw out a graph to suit your tension 24 stitches wide by however many rows you want. For example if your tension was 4 stitches and 6 rows to the inch your graph would measure 6 inches wide by 5 inches deep from top to bottom. (24 sts divided by 4 sts = 6 inches; 30 rows divided by 6 rows = 5 inches).
Draw the lines across and down to represent stitches and rows making individual squares – but use your own tension figures. This will give you an area true to the size of your knitting. Find an image of a guitar to trace or copy onto the graph then blank out all the squares that are at least three quarters covered by the outline. Each square represents a full stitch so don’t use squares where only a tiny corner is covered.
Punch out line by line onto a punchcard. This should give you a good outline of any subject just fill it in knitting with the colours of your choice. The pattern may look elongated when you punch it out on the punchcard but will knit up exactly as it appears on the graph.
It’s a bit complicated I know but worth a try if nothing else turns up.
Hope that helps
Wren
wren
2012-03-28 17:46:18
Hi Janet
Can I suggest you draw out a graph to suit your tension 24 stitches wide by however many rows you want. For example if your tension was 4 stitches and 6 rows to the inch your graph would measure 6 inches wide by 5 inches deep from top to bottom. (24 sts divided by 4 sts = 6 inches; 30 rows divided by 6 rows = 5 inches).
Draw the lines across and down to represent stitches and rows making individual squares – but use your own tension figures. This will give you an area true to the size of your knitting. Find an image of a guitar to trace or copy onto the graph then blank out all the squares that are at least three quarters covered by the outline. Each square represents a full stitch so don’t use squares where only a tiny corner is covered.
Punch out line by line onto a punchcard. This should give you a good outline of any subject just fill it in knitting with the colours of your choice. The pattern may look elongated when you punch it out on the punchcard but will knit up exactly as it appears on the graph.
It’s a bit complicated I know but worth a try if nothing else turns up.
Hope that helps
Wren
wren
2012-03-28 17:46:18

Singer Big Nine

Posted on

Namely the pairs of white plastic hooked combs, which I believe were meant to do ribbing on the machine. I remember that one was used to pick up alternate stitches from the bed of the machine, – lift, then flip over and clip to it’s ‘pair’ resting on the front slot of the machine bed. But it isn’t quite that simple, I remember there was a ‘fiddly bit’ – which took me ages to grasp at the time, and which now completely escapes my memory. I would now like to get some use out of the machine, and try to get back into knitting generally, now that I have more time.
Can anyone help please? Does anyone have the instructions for using these rib combs?
Many thanks if you can help.
Regards,
Wren

Knitmaster 326

Posted on

Hi
I’m hoping someone can help me. I’ve just bought a rather old Knitmaster 326 to start knitting again after several years and it seems to be minus one of the round brushes that need to be screwed onto the sinker plate to enable me to do tuck/slip/lace stitches. Does anyone have one that I can buy, or know where I can get one?

Hi re your 326 I have this machine and have bought brushes from Metropolitan but not tuck brushes so give them a try
Hilda
Hilda
2012-03-05 15:51:24
Thank you Hilda I’ve just checked the site and they have exactly what I want!
Wemada
2012-03-05 15:51:24
Hi re your 326 I have this machine and have bought brushes from Metropolitan but not tuck brushes so give them a try
Hilda
Hilda
2012-03-05 15:51:24
Thank you Hilda I’ve just checked the site and they have exactly what I want!
Wemada
2012-03-05 15:51:24

Knitmaster 700K radar stitch cards

Posted on

I recently bought a Knitmaster 700K with a built in Knit Radar but the stitch scales that came with the machine are the wrong ones and should be H4-H14 approximately 13½ inches long according to the manual. I have tried all the companies and eBay without success and without the scales I can’t use the Knit Radar. Does anyone have a set please?

Have you tried Metropolitan they stock most things.
ghowes
2012-08-02 17:05:29
Have you tried Metropolitan they stock most things.
ghowes
2012-08-02 17:05:29

Cast on comb

Posted on
Hi Tanna

I use a smallish screwdriver to manipulate them back into place.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-02-28 18:38:49
Thanks I will try that.
Tanna
2012-03-05 15:51:24
Hi Tanna

I use a smallish screwdriver to manipulate them back into place.

Regards
Sue.

Sue P
2012-02-28 18:38:49
Thanks I will try that.
Tanna
2012-03-05 15:51:24