Mocha Swirl Coat

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Everyone wants a wrap-around coat you can throw on over anything! Sometimes they’re a great way to hide from the world and Marianne Henio’s Mocha Swirl Coat is an absolute beauty. It’s almost floor length with an amazing twist at the hem. It’s a great way of taking a simple design and making it extra special. The details of how to create the swirl is fully explained in the pattern book. The coat can be knitted in any 3-ply weight and for more details, please follow the link and Click Here!

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New Knit & Natter Sessions

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Squire’s Garden Centres are launching new Knit & Natter sessions every Wednesday from 9.30 to 10.30 am in their Cafe Bars at selected centres. These free drop-in sessions are a great place to meet other knitting enthusiasts, swap skills and ideas, or just relax with a drink while you knit and natter!
Event: Knit & Natter
When: Every Wednesday 9.30 to 10.30 am (term time only)
Where: Squire’s Garden Centres – in the Café Bar
Locations: Badshot Lea, Milford, Shepperton & Twickenham
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G-carriage help needed!

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I recently got my G-carriage out of its box after years of neglect and have forgotten the trick of getting it to start. It’s a Brother KG-93 linked to my Brother 950i. I’ve followed the instructions and watched a video on line. I get the pattern position red light to light up and that’s it! Any ideas please – if not, it’ll go in the bin! Thanks for any help, Elizabeth

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Where did last year go!

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Dear readers

Is it that we’re all getting older, or where did last year go? Before I seem to have turned around, it’s time to get into gear again for our Bournemouth and Nottingham shows. Machine Knitting LIVE! is on Saturday 3rd March at Bournemouth School for Girls in Castle Gate Close, Castle Lane West, Bournemouth BH8 9UJ. We then return to West Park Leisure Centre in Wilsthorpe Road, Long Eaton NG10 4AA for the Nottingham Machine Knitting Show on Sunday 8th April. After last year’s many concerns about these two shows continuing, please make every effort to join us and support our craft in 2018.

It’s with great sadness that we say goodbye to Dennis Wright, as he’s made the decision to finally retire. Dennis and I go back into the mists of time, to the glory days of machine knitting. He was always a much-loved exhibitor and long before they became popular, he’d bring a selection of immaculate circular sock machines in full working order to many of the shows. Often his wife Freda would come along too, as No. 1 demonstrator and I loved the soft purr of the rise and fall of the needles when I gently turned the handle. Advancing years and increasing health problems have finally caught up with both Dennis and Freda. I thank them both for many years of camaraderie and Dennis especially for all his help and trustworthy advice. Our warm friendship will continue, but we’ll no longer have Dennis as a contributor and Knitting Buddy. I hope life is kind to both of them and that their future problems are few and far between.

Whilst we say goodbye to Dennis, we welcome back Clair Crowston as a regular contributor and we’ll be featuring a selection of her designs in the magazine. She’s been one of our Knitting Buddies for a long time and she’ll also join us at the Nottingham show. You’ll find many of her designs on her website at www.machineknittingdesigns-by-clair.co.uk and the patterns are a very reasonable £4 each. For a limited time, she’s offering three patterns for the price of two. Order the first two in the normal way and then send Clair an email with your choice of a third free pattern. Call her now on 01724-342130 or email clair.crowston@ntlworld.com if you’d like more information.

This issue goes out at the beginning of January, so all that remains is to send you my very best wishes and hopes for a happy, a healthy and a prosperous New Year.

 

NEXT ISSUE

March 2018

Subscription copies sent out Thursday 1st February

On sale Thursday 8th February

Ask your newsagent to reserve a copy now

 

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February 2018 – Issue 241

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February 2018 is our latest issue. It went out to subscribers on 4th January and is officially on sale on 11th January. If you order a latest issue and subscription bundle, we’ll send you this issue and your March 2018 magazine will be posted on Thursday 1st February.

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Great offer

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Little Knitting Fairy has waved her wand with a great offer. For the whole of January and until 11th February Joan Fielding-Browne is offering a FREE Bug Portable Sewing Machine worth £65 with the purchase of any knitting or sewing machine. They’re great for camping holidays, or if it rains and you get withdrawal symptoms. Contact Joan by phone for more details and all major debit and credit cards are accepted. For those who didn’t get the chance to knit warm socks, Joan has three pairs of ready-made left in size 6 to 8. (Joan is a shoe size 5 and they fit her well.)  They’re lovely and warm in boots or wellies and a bargain at £9.50 per pair. Call Joan on 01896-850734, email joan@littleknittingfairy.co.uk or visit the website at http://www.littleknittingfairy.co.uk

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Important announcement for Make it & Knit & Stitch It 2018 visitors

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The Organising Team has announced that Make It and Knit & Stitch It will not now take place in Farnborough in 2018. Unfortunately the new venue will not be ready to host the 2018 show. With the already over-packed craft exhibition calendar, there’s no suitable alternative date for the show. They apologise to all their loyal visitors, will be back with a flourish on 22nd and 23rd February 2019 and thank all their exhibitors and visitors for their continued support.

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Time for tea

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The Spring Knitting & Stitching Show has teamed up with the Betty Blythe Vintage Tea Room in West London’s Brook Green to hold The Knitted Tea Room competition. From cream scones with jam to champagne flutes, teapots and cucumber sandwiches, the show’s organisers are looking for a sumptuous spread of life-size knitted and crocheted tea room items.  Entrants can design their own tea room pieces or use a pattern and a tea cosy pattern by Monica Russel of The Knit Knacks is available to download from The Spring Knitting & Stitching Show competition page.

Entries will be displayed throughout the show and competition judges will be looking for innovative and beautifully made pieces.  Judging takes place on Thursday 1st March and luxury prizes from the Betty Blythe Vintage Tea Room will be awarded to three talented winning stitchers.  First prize is a Victorian-themed afternoon tea for eight, second prize is a Vintage Afternoon tea for six and third prize is a Cream tea for four.

All entries should be registered on the Spring show’s competition page, with up to five items eligible per entrant.  Items should be submitted before 23rd February to The Knitted Tea Room Competition, twistedthread, 58 White Lion St, London N1 9PP, or brought along to the show on Thursday 1st March. The Spring Show takes place from 1st to 4th March 2018 at Olympia London.  Spring Show highlights include over 200 workshops and free demonstrations hosted by expert tutors, galleries by leading textile artists, graduates and groups, drop-in knitting and crochet clinics and a unique craft shopping experience with 150 specialist retailers under one roof. Tickets are £13.50 in advance (concessions £12.50, children aged 5-18 £6.00) plus a booking fee of £1.50 payable per order.

A wide selection of options is available from www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com/spring or by calling 0844 581 1319 (+44 0121 796 6165 from outside the UK).

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Sock it to me

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Here’s a pattern for short 4-ply socks and they’re easy to knit on any standard or fine gauge machine with a ribber. If you don’t have a ribber, work ribs in mock rib.

MEASUREMENTS To fit shoe sizes 6 [7, 8, 9, 10, 11].

TENSION 32 sts and 44 rows to 10 cm, 4 in over stocking stitch with tension dial around 6 on standard gauge and 8 on fine gauge machines.

NOTES When shaping in HP, always take yarn round first inside N in HP to prevent a hole forming.

RIGHT SOCK With carriage at right and using MY, cast on 70 sts at centre of machine in 1×1 rib. K 5 tubular rows. Carriage is at right. Set machine for 1×1 rib knitting. Set RC at 000. Using MT-5/MT-5, K 11 rows. Transfer sts for st st. Set RC at 000. Using MT, K 3 rows. K 1 row extra for Left Sock. Shape sides by dec 1 st at each end on next and every foll 15th row until 60 sts rem. RC shows 64 (65 on Left Sock). Shape heel * Push 30 Ns at opposite end to carriage to HP. Cont on rem sts. K 2 rows. Push 1 N at opposite end to carriage to HP on next 14 rows. Push 1 inside N at opposite end to carriage from HP to UWP on next 14 rows. Push rem Ns from HP to UWP, K 1 row *. K 80 [82, 84, 88, 92, 96] rows. Shape toe Work as for heel from * to *. Using WY, K a few rows and release from machine.

LEFT SOCK Work as for Right Sock, reversing shaping by noting alteration in number of rows worked.

MAKING UP Press, then join side seams and graft sts tog under foot.

 

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Keep knitting our way

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Love your lace Here’s a tip about re-programming your punchcard machine if you’ve made a mistake when knitting a lace pattern. It’s always best to undo the whole block repeat of lace just knitted. This may mean putting several stitches that are on one needle back to their original place. Turn the punchcard back to where the last black curved arrow is on the card. It’s at this point you’d have worked, for example, ‘K 2 rows’ or similar. Look at the arrows on the left hand side of the card. By the black arrow is the red arrow, pointing to the right. Don’t lock the card, but carry on ‘lacing’ and you will be on the right row. The only time you do lock the card, when re-programming in lace, would be if the arrow was pointing to the right and the lace carriage was on the left. You’d next work one pass with the lace carriage and then release the card.

Sausage roll Have you any idea what’s a ‘knitted sausage’? For the life of me, I’ve never heard of it, but I’ve been told it really is something well-seasoned knitters know about and use. I’m not in the first flush of youth, but obviously need to keep going a bit longer before I’ve got enough seasoning! Can you help, please?

A ‘sausage’ is what some knitters used to call a cast-on strip and newbies will have no idea what we’re talking about. Instead of using waste yarn that we usually throw away, the ‘sausage’ or ‘cast-on strip’ not only saves yarn, but also gives even weighting to the work. It can be any width you like and there are many versions, but this one used to be popular. Most knitters made one long enough to use over about 100 stitches and a second that’s long enough to use when all needles are in work across the full width of the bed.

To knit it Over about 20 needles at the extreme left of the needlebed, cast on and make a bias strip in a brightly coloured 4-ply yarn. The colour isn’t really important but as it’s going to have a lot of handling, use a good quality yarn. Make the bias strip the length you wish and cast off. Steam press the strip well. Buy some curtain weighting in medium thickness and sew this weighting onto the edge where you did the decreasing. We use this edge because the side with increasing will have little holes all the way along it.

To use it Bring up required number of needles. Using a treble transfer tool, put the ends of the prongs through the little holes along the top edge onto the needles. The strip now hangs down very evenly all along. Using a nylon cord or similar, about Tension 6, knit one row. Continue now as you wish, either casting on again or going straight into knitting. On completion, pull one end of the cord gently, then go to the other end and pull it right out. The strip drops away, ready for use next time.

Warm as toast Here’s an easy hot water bottle cover to knit. Choose a Fair Isle pattern to make it cosier and it gives us the chance to use up scraps of waste yarn. Any yarn can be used but 4-ply is ideal. You can vary the number of rows and stitches but basically, cast on around 75 sts and K 10 rows plain. Change to Fair Isle for about 115 rows. K 5 rows plain. Cast off centre 12 sts with some scrap yarn and then cast them on again. This makes a hole for the bottle’s tail. Now knit the other half in reverse. For the tabs, measure 2½ inches in from each end, pick up 12 stitches and work 30 rows. Sew up the cover and, for extra strength, work a row of double crochet around the top edge and tabs. Sew snap fasteners on the tabs and front to finish it off.

Heat treatment Don’t we all have to unpick a piece of knitting? Wind the unravelled kinky yarn round a large heatproof jar and not too tight, just comfortable. It’s best to wind it as you go, so you don’t end up with a heap of kinks. Fill the jar with nearly boiling water and leave it to cool. By the time the water is cool, the yarn will be straight. If you don’t have a jar, someone I know uses a hot water bottle but I’ve never tried it. If you did this, I guess you might have to fill the bottle first and take care wrapping it round the hottie. You can then use a wool winder to wind the yarn back into a neat ball, ready to use again. I’ve done it for years and it may well have been a ‘Joan Lafferty special’! Keep knitting our way,

Waste not, want not Inspired by some of the articles I’ve read recently, I tried my hand at felting. Once I’d got the hang of it, I got completely carried away and then ran out of ideas what to do with all the felt. Not for long! I traced round an inner sole that I have in my trainers and now I’ve lovely warm, comfortable insoles. My husband’s a keen gardener, so he threw the cut-off bits on his compost heap.

 

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