War effort

Posted on

which has recently come up with what it calls a (moebius) snood, a lacy scarf with a single twist before stitching the cast-on to the cast-off edge, making a circle with a twist. When you put it over your head, it hangs in a neat fold in front.
that this is not a real snood. Snoods, as we made and wore them in the 1940s, were constructed from a single knitted or crocheted square. The row ends were gathered up at each side and fine elastic was threaded right round, through the cast-on and cast-off edges, so they looked like decorative hair-nets. The big joke was that if you made a larger double square, stitched the sides and put handles on the cast-on and cast-off edges, you’d made yourself a shopping bag for the groceries. That’s not as daft as it sounds and useful too because it was difficult to find shopping bags to buy during the war, when all materials went into ‘the war effort’. I’ll try to do a sketch on the laptop (the iMac doesn’t ‘do’ drawing!) and send it by snail mail!

Best wishes
Edna Cahill, Sandown, Isle of Wight

Mock Rib

Posted on

I have a silver reed 840 and when I do the first line everything is ok, but when I put the carriage back all the stitches fall off. it works fine if I cast on by hand.

Thanks.

Hi with regard to your problem when doing mock rib.

After doing the first row push all the needles out to d position for the next 4/6 rows and knit the rows – this should resolve your problem. After the initial 4/6 rows just knit normally.

Linda Collins
2010-01-28 20:57:59
Hi with regard to your problem when doing mock rib.

After doing the first row push all the needles out to d position for the next 4/6 rows and knit the rows – this should resolve your problem. After the initial 4/6 rows just knit normally.

Linda Collins
2010-01-28 20:57:59

Machine Knitting meetings in South Wales

Posted on

Thanks for any responses.

I myself am returning to machine knitting as a designer. I am thinking of setting up classes in design in machine knitting and would be interested to hear of any contacts you make who would be interested in these.

Angela Coryn
angela.coryn@btinternet.com
Tel: 01269 822375

angela coryn
2010-01-19 17:37:41
Hi Gail
I’m also returning to machine knitting after a period of 20 years and I’d like to be in contact with you and anyone in South Wales. (I live in Newport.)
I have a Brother 830 and would also like to exchange interests patterns and ideas.
Best wishes Mo
MAUREEN
2011-09-30 20:23:27

Machine Maintenance!

Posted on

Hi,
I am wishing to give my brother KH891 a spruce up – it just dropped a load of stitches off some fine lace I was trying to knit (using bramwell fine 4ply on tension 8) so I’m guessing the machine is asking for a clean.

2 of the needles are bent – so I know how to get those out – and I have ordered some new ones – and also a new sponge bar for good measure (I wouldn’t know how to tell if the old sponge bar was okay or not!)
I know the good needles need to be soaked in something – what? (methelayted spirits or surgical spirit?)
Then I guess they have to be carefully polished with a rag.

I think I’m to try to hoover out any fluff from the main needle bed if I can – and give the machine a wipe over (just a cloth – or something on the cloth?)
I know I need to sparingly rub some silicone oil over the machine (that’s on order too – but order is being delayed by snow and ice!)…

Any concise help in exactly how to complete the maintenance would be gratefully received. The machine has been in storage for a year or so. It has been little used by me – and came to me in good condition – so I don’t suppose there’s much wrong with it really.

I’m really wanting to get knitting again – and take good care of this old machine!

Put the needles in a jam jar top up with surgical spirit and a teaspoon of machine oil. Put the lid on and leave to soak while you clean the machine.
Vacuuming will remove most of the fluff but an old needle can be used to pick out any stubborn bits. Wipe the needlebed and rails with a cloth lightly moistened with oil (don’t use WD40).
Now for the needles: Give the jar a shake to loosen the dirt. Remove needles one at a time and wipe on the oily cloth checking for bent needles and stiff latches. Replace each one as you go.
Use a lightly oiled cloth to wipe the underside of the carriage.
Sue P
2010-01-17 20:55:50
Put the needles in a jam jar top up with surgical spirit and a teaspoon of machine oil. Put the lid on and leave to soak while you clean the machine.
Vacuuming will remove most of the fluff but an old needle can be used to pick out any stubborn bits. Wipe the needlebed and rails with a cloth lightly moistened with oil (don’t use WD40).
Now for the needles: Give the jar a shake to loosen the dirt. Remove needles one at a time and wipe on the oily cloth checking for bent needles and stiff latches. Replace each one as you go.
Use a lightly oiled cloth to wipe the underside of the carriage.
Sue P
2010-01-17 20:55:50

Elena Bulky Machine

Posted on
Hi
I found this website which may be of help:

http://knittsings.com/how-to-make-a-knitting-machine-needle-retainer-sponge-bar-part-1-remove-the-old-and-clean-for-new/

If you really can’t buy a new one – it looks very possible to make good the old one!

I usually buy from bsk – they are on eBay and you may be able to contact them to see if they can get a sponge bar to fit.

Wrapaholic
2010-01-15 14:18:06
Hi Wrapaholic

I would like to buy a new one but if I can’t thanks for the information but where do you buy the felt?

Do you cut it to fit?

Thanks
Angie

angelina
2010-01-19 19:42:30
Hi Have you tried Ebay I have just bought one for my old Jones Brother 910. Price was reasonable as well.

Also try BSK – they are usually very helpful.
Gail

Gail Rees
2010-01-16 15:19:45
Hi I have just followed the instructions on Knitsings for my Toyota 901 – sponge bars are no longer available.
I bought 1/2 inch foam on ebay and some woven iron-on interfacing but it is rather a loose weave and I think Vilene might be better. A rotary cutter sliced through the foam really cleanly. I am really pleased with the result.
Sue P
2010-01-18 08:36:53
Hi
I found this website which may be of help:

http://knittsings.com/how-to-make-a-knitting-machine-needle-retainer-sponge-bar-part-1-remove-the-old-and-clean-for-new/

If you really can’t buy a new one – it looks very possible to make good the old one!

I usually buy from bsk – they are on eBay and you may be able to contact them to see if they can get a sponge bar to fit.

Wrapaholic
2010-01-15 14:18:06
Hi Wrapaholic

I would like to buy a new one but if I can’t thanks for the information but where do you buy the felt?

Do you cut it to fit?

Thanks
Angie

angelina
2010-01-19 19:42:30
Hi Have you tried Ebay I have just bought one for my old Jones Brother 910. Price was reasonable as well.

Also try BSK – they are usually very helpful.
Gail

Gail Rees
2010-01-16 15:19:45
Hi I have just followed the instructions on Knitsings for my Toyota 901 – sponge bars are no longer available.
I bought 1/2 inch foam on ebay and some woven iron-on interfacing but it is rather a loose weave and I think Vilene might be better. A rotary cutter sliced through the foam really cleanly. I am really pleased with the result.
Sue P
2010-01-18 08:36:53

Ideas for unusual knitted items

Posted on

I used a white shiny thin yarn, with some red and dark green.
Cast on over 190 needles, on a standard gauge machine, k 16 rows, a fold row, 32 rows, a fold row, 16 rows.
Hang cast on sts onto needles and cast off.
Join two ends together, and lightly press. it fitted perfectly around a 7 square cake, and looked really good.
The pattern happens over the middle 32 rows, which show; I used a holly and berries punchcard pattern sandwiched between a pair of narrow dark green stripes.

I’m new to this technology but I will include a picture if i can work out how.
I have just taken out a subscription to this magazine and look forward to receiving my first issue soon

Happy new Year to knitters everywhere.
Mannie McClelland
West Sussex

24122009192.jpg”

This looks incredible well done.
wenhenti
2010-11-03 17:58:24