End Needle Selection

Posted on

Many thanks.

Hi
When working end needle selection’ brings the needles at the edges to ‘D’ position so that they knit the contrast colour when knitting Fair Isle and knit a plain stitch when knitting tuck or slip. This makes it easier to increase or decrease stitches when knitting textured patterns as you have a plain stitch at the edge of the knitting. Just push back the 2 edge needles to ‘B’ position work the increase or decrease and bring the edge needles back to ‘D’ position so they knit on the next row.
However when you knit an open stitch pattern with some needles in ‘A’ position you switch off the ‘end needle selection’ otherwise the needles next to the ones in ‘A’ position will be selected to knit and the pattern will not knit correctly.
The above would apply if you are knitting a tuck rib pattern with a punchcard and needles knitting or tucking on the ribber. Whether you have ‘end needle selection’ on or off depends on the needle set up on the main bed.
I do hope this helps you sort it out.
Regards Sue.
Sue P
2011-05-17 16:49:12
Thank you Sue. I think I am starting to understand! Sometimes it takes a bit of time. So often I have ended up with a very messy edge when attempting to increase or decrease when working in tuck stitch. I get loops that just will not knit off properly several stitches in from the ends after an increase/decrease.
I have given up trying to do Fair Isle passed the armholes as it always ends in disaster!
I have always had all needles on the main bed in work so I take it I should then always have ‘end needle selection’ so that means I am making some other mistake! Back to the drawing board then!
remone
2011-06-01 15:58:09
Hi Remone
Yes I think you usually keep ‘end needle selection’ on as it saves you having to manually move needles forward at the edges.
When knitting tuck stitch make sure you move the claw weights up frequently especially when increasing and decreasing and always use them once you have started the armhole decreasing. This should help the stitches to knit off properly.
Regards
Sue.
Sue P
2011-06-01 16:11:30
Hi
When working end needle selection’ brings the needles at the edges to ‘D’ position so that they knit the contrast colour when knitting Fair Isle and knit a plain stitch when knitting tuck or slip. This makes it easier to increase or decrease stitches when knitting textured patterns as you have a plain stitch at the edge of the knitting. Just push back the 2 edge needles to ‘B’ position work the increase or decrease and bring the edge needles back to ‘D’ position so they knit on the next row.
However when you knit an open stitch pattern with some needles in ‘A’ position you switch off the ‘end needle selection’ otherwise the needles next to the ones in ‘A’ position will be selected to knit and the pattern will not knit correctly.
The above would apply if you are knitting a tuck rib pattern with a punchcard and needles knitting or tucking on the ribber. Whether you have ‘end needle selection’ on or off depends on the needle set up on the main bed.
I do hope this helps you sort it out.
Regards Sue.
Sue P
2011-05-17 16:49:12
Thank you Sue. I think I am starting to understand! Sometimes it takes a bit of time. So often I have ended up with a very messy edge when attempting to increase or decrease when working in tuck stitch. I get loops that just will not knit off properly several stitches in from the ends after an increase/decrease.
I have given up trying to do Fair Isle passed the armholes as it always ends in disaster!
I have always had all needles on the main bed in work so I take it I should then always have ‘end needle selection’ so that means I am making some other mistake! Back to the drawing board then!
remone
2011-06-01 15:58:09
Hi Remone
Yes I think you usually keep ‘end needle selection’ on as it saves you having to manually move needles forward at the edges.
When knitting tuck stitch make sure you move the claw weights up frequently especially when increasing and decreasing and always use them once you have started the armhole decreasing. This should help the stitches to knit off properly.
Regards
Sue.
Sue P
2011-06-01 16:11:30
Share on:Share on FacebookTweet about this on Twitter